• Travel & Transport
      February 2017

      Greetings from

      by Campbell Jefferys

      This collection of travel stories has been gathered over twenty years of travel and writing. They cover many places and themes, but all circle around the idea of being a stranger in a strange land. As a sample, the stories involve playing street basketball in New York, going underground in Berlin, pushing a boat in Indonesia, chasing ghosts in Vienna, and going back in time on Lanzarote.

    • General cookery & recipes
      March 2016

      Picnic Crumbs

      A Gathering of Picnics, Packed Lunches and Provisons at Home and Abroad

      by Anabel Loyd

      Picnic Crumbs is a collection of stories, from all sorts of people over several centuries, of food produced or eaten in a way that may, even when it is a banquet, just about be defined as a picnic. Writers, travellers and gastronomes of all persuasions describe picnics past, present, perfect and imperfect, in this delightfully eclectic anthology collected by Anabel Loyd, herself the daughter of a family whose picnics have been eaten by a mix of guests from prime ministers to Pekingeses.

    • Biography & True Stories
      May 2013

      The Valbonne Monologues

      by Chris France

      Living the life of the idle rich on the Cote d'Azur, here are some of the things being said about the author and his writing: - "The funniest book I have ever read." - "As funny as Wilt by Tom Sharp." - "50 shades of shite." - "As intellectually challenging as reading Heat magazine with a hangover." - "As appealing as sucking warm diarrhoea through a tramps sock." - "This book makes those who suggest you should never stop trying look really stupid." - "Somhow death seems a less daunting prospect after reading this book." - "If you want a gripping tale delivered with fine turns of phrase and an evocative prose, read another book."

    • Biography & True Stories
      October 2013

      Going Solo on Lake Como

      by Ciara O'Toole

      Sometimes flying by the seat of your pants is the best thing you can do … When Ciara O’Toole and her husband move to Lake Como, Italy, they make plans – to run their own businesses, to learn the language and to immerse themselves in the Italian way of life. But just a few months into the adventure Ciara’s marriage ends and she finds herself alone in a country where she doesn’t speak the language. She is faced with a choice: return to Ireland or stay in Italy and make her new life work. Determined to make a go of it, she throws herself into everything – forging new friendships – whirlwind romances, attempting to eat her own weight in four-cheese pizzas … and learning to fly a seaplane! Her new passion grips her as she works tirelessly towards an all-important milestone: her first solo flight. Told with warmth, humour and disarming honesty, Going Solo on Lake Como is the inspirational story of how one woman finds her wings and takes to the skies. ‘It made me laugh, it made me cry. It is epic in scope but incredibly intimate.’ Jane Maas

    • Classic travel writing

      Travels with a Donkey in Cevennes

      by Robert Louis Stevenson (author)

      Text difficulty between popular and professional readers For English major and learners at intermediate and advanced levels Based on classic works, involving various fields of social sciences, adopting a bilingual format, providing cultural annotations Selected works of various subjects and styles, some being witty and humorous and some being sarcastic and heuristic

    • Classic travel writing

      An Inland Voyage

      by Robert Louis Stevenson (author)

      Text difficulty between popular and professional readers For English major and learners at intermediate and advanced levels Based on classic works, involving various fields of social sciences, adopting a bilingual format, providing cultural annotations Selected works of various subjects and styles, some being witty and humorous and some being sarcastic and heuristic

    • Classic fiction (pre c 1945)

      Three Men in a Boat

      by Jerome K. Jerome (author)

      Text difficulty between popular and professional readers For English major and learners at intermediate and advanced levels Based on classic works, involving various fields of social sciences, adopting a bilingual format, providing cultural annotations Selected works of various subjects and styles, some being witty and humorous and some being sarcastic and heuristic

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2013

      Contact in Context

      by Editor(s): Sandhya Patel

      Contact between cultures has been understood in various ways and this particular volume considers the European cultural, social, scientific, philosophical and political contexts framing encounter. All of the essays thus look at the different ways in which individuals and institutions work these contexts into their representations of contact settings.In Part 1, the conventional stance is adopted where encounter is understood as taking place elsewhere and not on European soil. The chapters examine contact far afield and focus on how public and private contexts act upon ensuing interpretations and representations of inter-cultural interaction.Part 2 considers ‘contact within’, positing inversed sites of encounter. The essays point to the arrival of these discovered peoples on European soil as the eras of exploration ushered in periods of settlement and extended colonisation. The paradigm of contact between Europeans and Others (and Other spaces) was thus displaced both figuratively and literally. Amongst the conduits for such representations were the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century European exhibitions or fairs. The studies here suggest that these encounters were also engineered by domestic contexts which gradually enclosed interaction within further, restrictive conceptual frameworks, not on islands and beaches, but in European towns and cities.

    • Educational: English literature
      October 2013

      Lake Garda

      Gateway to D. H. Lawrence’s Voyage to the Sun

      by Editor(s): Nick Ceramella

      “Comes over one an absolute necessity to move.” This opening sentence of Sea and Sardinia (1921) is strikingly telling about D. H. Lawrence’s life, which can be considered both literally and metaphorically as a journey to the sun. In this respect, as the title of our symposium – “Lake Garda: Gateway to D. H. Lawrence’s Voyage to the Sun” – suggests, he began his life-long quest in Gargnano, in 1912. This eponymous book draws together the papers presented at the Gargnano Symposium in 2012 to commemorate the centenary of the writer’s stay in that “paradise” (3 September 1912 – 11 April 1913).The focus of our event was on Lawrence’s “sun search” and “travelling”; two thought-provoking, multifaceted topics for a sparkling critical debate, expanding outside “canonic” criticism into music and painting. This collection, in fact, comes with a CD featuring 12 songs; poems by Lawrence put to music for soprano and piano by the American composer William Neil. It also includes the reproduction of seven paintings from “Via D. H. Lawrence”, out of a sequence of 25, in which the German painter Sabine Frank follows the writer’s footsteps in the Garda area. The result is a unique and stimulating book, combining literature, music and painting. Thus, it provides an invaluable enrichment for all of us, meant to inspire intellectual confrontation and circulation of ideas in the domain of Laurentian studies. This is the sort of book that any Laurentian, reading either for academic purposes or pleasure, cannot possibly miss.

    • Classic travel writing
      June 2006

      Travel and Travellers from Bede to Dampier

      by Editor(s): Geraldine Barnes with Gabrielle Singleton

      The essays in this collection -- a selection of papers presented at the University of Sydney Centre for Medieval Studies workshop, ‘Travel and Cartography from Bede to the Enlightenment’ (August 22-23, 2001) – track a variety of travel narratives from the eighth century to the eighteenth. Their voyages, which extend from from the literal to the spiritual, the political, and the artistic, show how the concept of narrative mapping has changed over time, and how it encompasses cosmogony, geography, chorography, topography, and inventory. Each essay is concerned in some way with the application of the medieval geographical imagination, or with the enduring influence of that imagination upon post-medieval travel and discovery writing.This book will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate university students and to a broad range of academics across the disciplines of literature and history. It will be of particular interest to medievalists and scholars of the early modern period and to readers of, the new (1997) scholarly journal, Studies in Travel Writing.The volume will also appeal to a more general, informed readership interested in the history of travel and the history of ideas, early contact with indigenous people, and encounters between East and West.

    • Classic travel writing
      June 2006

      Travel and Travellers from Bede to Dampier

      by Editor(s): Geraldine Barnes with Gabrielle Singleton

      The essays in this collection -- a selection of papers presented at the University of Sydney Centre for Medieval Studies workshop, ‘Travel and Cartography from Bede to the Enlightenment’ (August 22-23, 2001) – track a variety of travel narratives from the eighth century to the eighteenth. Their voyages, which extend from from the literal to the spiritual, the political, and the artistic, show how the concept of narrative mapping has changed over time, and how it encompasses cosmogony, geography, chorography, topography, and inventory. Each essay is concerned in some way with the application of the medieval geographical imagination, or with the enduring influence of that imagination upon post-medieval travel and discovery writing.This book will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate university students and to a broad range of academics across the disciplines of literature and history. It will be of particular interest to medievalists and scholars of the early modern period and to readers of, the new (1997) scholarly journal, Studies in Travel Writing.The volume will also appeal to a more general, informed readership interested in the history of travel and the history of ideas, early contact with indigenous people, and encounters between East and West.

    • Classic travel writing
      February 2003

      Armenia

      A Year at Erzerum

      by Author(s): Robert Curzon Editor(s): Rudolf Abraham

      Curzon’s Armenia describes the author’s residence at Erzerum, in Eastern Turkey, from 1843 to 1844. Appointed to the joint Anglo-Russian, Turkish and Persian commission whose task it was to establish a fixed Turkish-Persian boundary across highland Armenia, and thus check border incursions by Kurdish tribes, Curzon paints a detailed portrait of this fascinating area during the mid 19th century. Commencing with a description of his journey via the Black Sea, Trebizond (Trabzon) and the mountain route to Erzerum, he goes on to describe, in considerable detail, not only the city of Erzerum itself, but also the character, history, climate, flora and fauna of the surrounding area. Together with a more general history of Armenia, Curzon also gives details of its ecclesiastical history and religious establishments, manuscripts and monastic libraries, modern division and population. This edition maintains all the material from the original 1854 edition, including the map and illustrations.

    • Classic travel writing
      February 2003

      Travels in Central Asia

      by Author(s): Arminius Vambery Editor(s): Rudolf Abraham

      Vambery’s Travels in Central Asia describes the author’s celebrated journey through Central Asia in 1863, motivated by linguistic research. Disguised as a dervish and travelling with a party of Muslim pilgrims, he succeeded in crossing the dreaded Turkoman desert via the ancient bed of the Oxus, and visiting the cities of Khiva, Bokhara and Samarkand without detection. As well as describing these cities during their final years of independence (all were annexed by Russia within ten years of his visit), Vambery gives considerable details of the social and political relations, character and customs of the region. Finally, he provides a vivid narrative of caravan life, and of a remarkable journey in which he went in constant danger of exposure. This edition maintains all the material from the original 1864 edition, including the various tables, and illustrations. Only the map has been reduced in scale.

    • Memoirs
      May 2015

      A Bengali Lady in England by Krishnabhabini Das (1885)

      by Editor(s): Somdatta Mandal

      This is a translation from Bengali to English of the first ever woman’s travel narrative written in the late nineteenth century when India was still under British imperial rule with Bengal as its capital. Krishnabhabini Das (1864–1919) was a middle-class Bengali lady who accompanied her husband on his second visit to England in 1882, where they lived for eight years. Krishnabhabini wrote her narrative in Bengali and the account was published in Calcutta in 1885 as England-e Bongomohila [A Bengali Lady in England]. This anonymous publication had the author’s name written simply as “A Bengali Lady”. It is not a travel narrative per se as Das was also trying to educate fellow Indians about different aspects of British life, such as the English race and their nature, the English lady, English marriage and domestic life, religion and celebration, British labour, and trade. Though Hindu women did not observe the purdah as Muslim women did, they had, until then, remained largely invisible, confined within their homes and away from the public gaze. Their rightful place was within the domestic sphere and it was quite uncommon for a middle-class Indian woman to expose herself to the outside world or participate in activities and debates in the public domain. This self-ordained mission of educating people back home with the ground realities in England is what makes Krishnabhabini’s narrative unique. The narrative offers a brilliant picture of the colonial interface between England and India and shows how women travellers from India to Europe worked to shape feminized personae characterized by conventionality, conservatism and domesticity, even as they imitated a male-dominated tradition of travel and travel writing.

    • Classic travel writing
      February 2003

      Armenia

      A Year at Erzerum

      by Author(s): Robert Curzon Editor(s): Rudolf Abraham

      Curzon’s Armenia describes the author’s residence at Erzerum, in Eastern Turkey, from 1843 to 1844. Appointed to the joint Anglo-Russian, Turkish and Persian commission whose task it was to establish a fixed Turkish-Persian boundary across highland Armenia, and thus check border incursions by Kurdish tribes, Curzon paints a detailed portrait of this fascinating area during the mid 19th century. Commencing with a description of his journey via the Black Sea, Trebizond (Trabzon) and the mountain route to Erzerum, he goes on to describe, in considerable detail, not only the city of Erzerum itself, but also the character, history, climate, flora and fauna of the surrounding area. Together with a more general history of Armenia, Curzon also gives details of its ecclesiastical history and religious establishments, manuscripts and monastic libraries, modern division and population. This edition maintains all the material from the original 1854 edition, including the map and illustrations.

    • Classic travel writing
      June 2006

      Travel and Travellers from Bede to Dampier

      by Editor(s): Geraldine Barnes with Gabrielle Singleton

      The essays in this collection -- a selection of papers presented at the University of Sydney Centre for Medieval Studies workshop, ‘Travel and Cartography from Bede to the Enlightenment’ (August 22-23, 2001) – track a variety of travel narratives from the eighth century to the eighteenth. Their voyages, which extend from from the literal to the spiritual, the political, and the artistic, show how the concept of narrative mapping has changed over time, and how it encompasses cosmogony, geography, chorography, topography, and inventory. Each essay is concerned in some way with the application of the medieval geographical imagination, or with the enduring influence of that imagination upon post-medieval travel and discovery writing.This book will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate university students and to a broad range of academics across the disciplines of literature and history. It will be of particular interest to medievalists and scholars of the early modern period and to readers of, the new (1997) scholarly journal, Studies in Travel Writing.The volume will also appeal to a more general, informed readership interested in the history of travel and the history of ideas, early contact with indigenous people, and encounters between East and West.

    • Classic travel writing
      February 2003

      Travels in Central Asia

      by Author(s): Arminius Vambery Editor(s): Rudolf Abraham

      Vambery’s Travels in Central Asia describes the author’s celebrated journey through Central Asia in 1863, motivated by linguistic research. Disguised as a dervish and travelling with a party of Muslim pilgrims, he succeeded in crossing the dreaded Turkoman desert via the ancient bed of the Oxus, and visiting the cities of Khiva, Bokhara and Samarkand without detection. As well as describing these cities during their final years of independence (all were annexed by Russia within ten years of his visit), Vambery gives considerable details of the social and political relations, character and customs of the region. Finally, he provides a vivid narrative of caravan life, and of a remarkable journey in which he went in constant danger of exposure. This edition maintains all the material from the original 1864 edition, including the various tables, and illustrations. Only the map has been reduced in scale.

    • Educational: English literature
      October 2013

      Lake Garda

      Gateway to D. H. Lawrence’s Voyage to the Sun

      by Editor(s): Nick Ceramella

      “Comes over one an absolute necessity to move.” This opening sentence of Sea and Sardinia (1921) is strikingly telling about D. H. Lawrence’s life, which can be considered both literally and metaphorically as a journey to the sun. In this respect, as the title of our symposium – “Lake Garda: Gateway to D. H. Lawrence’s Voyage to the Sun” – suggests, he began his life-long quest in Gargnano, in 1912. This eponymous book draws together the papers presented at the Gargnano Symposium in 2012 to commemorate the centenary of the writer’s stay in that “paradise” (3 September 1912 – 11 April 1913).The focus of our event was on Lawrence’s “sun search” and “travelling”; two thought-provoking, multifaceted topics for a sparkling critical debate, expanding outside “canonic” criticism into music and painting. This collection, in fact, comes with a CD featuring 12 songs; poems by Lawrence put to music for soprano and piano by the American composer William Neil. It also includes the reproduction of seven paintings from “Via D. H. Lawrence”, out of a sequence of 25, in which the German painter Sabine Frank follows the writer’s footsteps in the Garda area. The result is a unique and stimulating book, combining literature, music and painting. Thus, it provides an invaluable enrichment for all of us, meant to inspire intellectual confrontation and circulation of ideas in the domain of Laurentian studies. This is the sort of book that any Laurentian, reading either for academic purposes or pleasure, cannot possibly miss.

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2013

      Contact in Context

      by Editor(s): Sandhya Patel

      Contact between cultures has been understood in various ways and this particular volume considers the European cultural, social, scientific, philosophical and political contexts framing encounter. All of the essays thus look at the different ways in which individuals and institutions work these contexts into their representations of contact settings.In Part 1, the conventional stance is adopted where encounter is understood as taking place elsewhere and not on European soil. The chapters examine contact far afield and focus on how public and private contexts act upon ensuing interpretations and representations of inter-cultural interaction.Part 2 considers ‘contact within’, positing inversed sites of encounter. The essays point to the arrival of these discovered peoples on European soil as the eras of exploration ushered in periods of settlement and extended colonisation. The paradigm of contact between Europeans and Others (and Other spaces) was thus displaced both figuratively and literally. Amongst the conduits for such representations were the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century European exhibitions or fairs. The studies here suggest that these encounters were also engineered by domestic contexts which gradually enclosed interaction within further, restrictive conceptual frameworks, not on islands and beaches, but in European towns and cities.

    • Memoirs
      May 2015

      A Bengali Lady in England by Krishnabhabini Das (1885)

      by Editor(s): Somdatta Mandal

      This is a translation from Bengali to English of the first ever woman’s travel narrative written in the late nineteenth century when India was still under British imperial rule with Bengal as its capital. Krishnabhabini Das (1864–1919) was a middle-class Bengali lady who accompanied her husband on his second visit to England in 1882, where they lived for eight years. Krishnabhabini wrote her narrative in Bengali and the account was published in Calcutta in 1885 as England-e Bongomohila [A Bengali Lady in England]. This anonymous publication had the author’s name written simply as “A Bengali Lady”. It is not a travel narrative per se as Das was also trying to educate fellow Indians about different aspects of British life, such as the English race and their nature, the English lady, English marriage and domestic life, religion and celebration, British labour, and trade. Though Hindu women did not observe the purdah as Muslim women did, they had, until then, remained largely invisible, confined within their homes and away from the public gaze. Their rightful place was within the domestic sphere and it was quite uncommon for a middle-class Indian woman to expose herself to the outside world or participate in activities and debates in the public domain. This self-ordained mission of educating people back home with the ground realities in England is what makes Krishnabhabini’s narrative unique. The narrative offers a brilliant picture of the colonial interface between England and India and shows how women travellers from India to Europe worked to shape feminized personae characterized by conventionality, conservatism and domesticity, even as they imitated a male-dominated tradition of travel and travel writing.

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