• Biography: science, technology & engineering
      March 2015

      Thank you, Madagascar

      Conservation Diaries of Alison Jolly

      by Alison Jolly

      Madagascar is one of the world’s natural jewels, with over ninety per cent of its wildlife found nowhere else on Earth. Few people knew it better than the pioneering primatologist and conservationist, Alison Jolly. Thank You, Madagascar is her eyewitness account of the extraordinary biodiversity of the island, and the environment of its people. At the book’s heart is a conflict between three different views of nature. Is the extraordinary forest treasure-house of Madagascar a heritage for the entire world? Is it a legacy of the forest dwellers’ ancestors, bequeathed to serve the needs of their living descendants? Or is it an economic resource to be pillaged for short-term gain and to be preserved only to deliver benefits for those with political power? Exploring and questioning these different views, this is a beautifully written diary and a tribute to Madagascar.

    • Biography & True Stories

      Dreamscape

      Real Dreams Really Make a Difference

      by Martha Cinader

      From ancient history to near-modern times, this collection of short stories and poetry is about fascinating people in history who followed their dreams and changed the world. The repertoire was developed in performance in clubs, schools, libraries, jazz festivals and at the International Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Included are stories about Nicola Tesla, Albert Einstein, Josephine Baker, Queen Boedicea, Sacajawea and more. Described as "a hip beatnick Sesame Street for grownups," the stories are engaging for middle schoolers and up, and would appeal to teachers and librarians for their educational and entertainment value. The collection would also lend itself to adaptation for an educational animated TV series. Martha would like to see the life of this repertoire of biographical stories be extended to other mediums through licensing and permissions opportunities. For a more detailed description please see the Supporting Information PDF.

    • Biography: general

      Simply Dirac

      by Helge Kragh

      Paul Dirac (1902–1984) was a brilliant mathematician and a 1933 Nobel laureate whose work ranks alongside that of Albert Einstein and Sir Isaac Newton. Although not as well known as his famous contemporaries Werner Heisenberg and Richard Feynman, his influence on the course of physics was immense. His landmark book, The Principles of Quantum Mechanics, introduced that new science to the world and his “Dirac equation” was the first theory to reconcile special relativity and quantum mechanics. Dirac held the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics at Cambridge University, a position also occupied by such luminaries as Isaac Newton and Stephen Hawking. Yet, during his 40-year career as a professor, he had only a few doctoral students due to his peculiar personality, which bordered on the bizarre. Taciturn and introverted, with virtually no social skills, he once turned down a knighthood because he didn’t want to be addressed by his first name. Einstein described him as “balancing on the dizzying path between genius and madness.” In Simply Dirac, author Helge Kragh blends the scientific and the personal, and invites the reader to get to know both Dirac the quantum genius and Dirac the social misfit. Featuring cameo appearances by some of the greatest scientists of the 20th century and highlighting the dramatic changes that occurred in the field of physics during Dirac’s lifetime, this fascinating biography is an invaluable introduction to a truly singular man.

    • Biography & True Stories
      January 2014

      Eco-Logical Lives

      The Philosophical Lives of Richard Routley/Sylvan and Val Routley/Plumwood

      by Dominic Hyde

      AN INTELLECTUAL BIOGRAPHY OF TWO PIONEERS OF ECO-LOGICAL LIVING. Richard Sylvan and Val Plumwood were eminent twentieth-century Australian philosophers who, in the way of philosophers, devoted their lives to examining fundamental assumptions about thought and the world. Though they were both renowned logicians – and probed metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, social and political theory and economics – it was their determination to fuse the practical and the intellectual, to ‘walk the talk’, that made them special. The world they sought to elucidate was not solely interior; not for them mere navel-gazing or abstract theorising, but a passionate concern about the non-human world and the non-human others with which we share it: Sylvan was convinced of the culpability of the philosopher who could ‘fiddle while the Earth begins to burn’. They were renowned as practical and rhetorical defenders of Australia’s forests, as zealous conservationists who not only campaigned for the non-human world but tried to codify philosophically an ‘environmental culture’ that would be ethically and rationally engaged with it. Their philosophical endeavours to provide a modern foundation for such a culture were as much rooted in the forests they inhabited and worked physically to protect as in the academy; indeed Plumwood claimed that her every word had ‘the thought of the forest behind it, as the ultimate progenitor and meaning of my speech’. To them, the separation of physical and intellectual labour was as wrong as, and symptomatic of, human alienation from nature; and they strove to reconnect these artificial, dangerous dichotomies. While Sylvan strove for the general ‘greening of ethics’, Plumwood became increasingly aware of other toxic dichotomies that infused gender politics, going on to gain recognition as a pioneering eco-feminist. Sylvan and Plumwood were iconoclastic, anarchic, and spoke what they believed without concern for social nicety. In their lives and in their works they promoted an ‘eco-logic’ to live by, a world view that, in the years since their deaths, has become ever more essential. In the present volume Dominic Hyde explores their intertwined lives and complex ideas with lucidity, respect and clear-sighted affection.

    • Science & Mathematics
      November 2017

      Henry Dresser and Victorian ornithology

      Birds, books and business

      by Henry A. McGhie

      This book explores the life of Henry Dresser (1838-1915), one of the most productive British ornithologists of the mid-late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and is largely based on previously unpublished archival material. Dresser travelled widely and spent time in Texas during the American Civil War. He built enormous collections of skins and eggs of birds from Europe, North America and Asia, which formed the basis of over 100 publications, including some of the finest bird books of the late nineteenth century. Dresser was a leading figure in scientific society and in the early bird conservation movement; his correspondence and diaries reveal the inner workings, motivations, personal relationships and rivalries that existed among the leading ornithologists.

    • Science & Mathematics
      November 2017

      Henry Dresser and Victorian ornithology

      Birds, books and business

      by Henry A. McGhie

      This book explores the life of Henry Dresser (1838-1915), one of the most productive British ornithologists of the mid-late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and is largely based on previously unpublished archival material. Dresser travelled widely and spent time in Texas during the American Civil War. He built enormous collections of skins and eggs of birds from Europe, North America and Asia, which formed the basis of over 100 publications, including some of the finest bird books of the late nineteenth century. Dresser was a leading figure in scientific society and in the early bird conservation movement; his correspondence and diaries reveal the inner workings, motivations, personal relationships and rivalries that existed among the leading ornithologists.

    • Science & Mathematics
      November 2017

      Henry Dresser and Victorian ornithology

      Birds, books and business

      by Henry A. McGhie

      This book explores the life of Henry Dresser (1838-1915), one of the most productive British ornithologists of the mid-late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and is largely based on previously unpublished archival material. Dresser travelled widely and spent time in Texas during the American Civil War. He built enormous collections of skins and eggs of birds from Europe, North America and Asia, which formed the basis of over 100 publications, including some of the finest bird books of the late nineteenth century. Dresser was a leading figure in scientific society and in the early bird conservation movement; his correspondence and diaries reveal the inner workings, motivations, personal relationships and rivalries that existed among the leading ornithologists.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering
      June 2017

      Evan James Williams

      Ffisegydd yr Atom

      by Rowland Wynne

      Cyfrol sy’n cyflwyno hanes y ffisegydd Evan James Williams, un o’r gwyddonwyr mwyaf galluog a welodd Cymru erioed. Bu’n gweithio gyda ffisegwyr byd-enwog, rhai yn enillwyr gwobr Nobel, ac ymysg ei lwyddiannau chwaraeodd ran allweddol yn narganfyddiad gronyn elfennol newydd.

    • Biography & True Stories
      October 2013

      Call the Pharmacist

      by Elizabeth Roddick

      Set in Glasgow, Elizabeth Roddick, an NHS award-winning pharmacist, gives a very personal account of her life in and out of her community pharmacy. Starting with her father’s struggle as a chemist in 1938, she details the rich, humorous and sometimes poignant stories of the interaction with her patients and customers. The development of pharmacy services over the 30 year period is illustrated as well as demonstrating her holistic approach to health within her pharmacy and in the public speaking arena.

    • Computing & IT
      May 2019

      Routes to the Information Revolution

      by Author(s): Alexander Arbel Editor(s): Joseph Agassi

      This book is a precise and comprehensive history of the digital computer. It is the first collection of available information about the digital computer, beginning with the philosophical and logical advancements in the early 20th century that led to it. The book explores the histories and stories of the computer, tracing its roots and routes. It examines and analyzes commonly accepted views on the digital computer and its development, and offers clearer and more accurate alternatives to them. Its approach, though dealing with the introduction and development of the digital computer, is applicable to the history of technology in general.The central question considered here is, why were the automatic digital program-controlled calculating devices developed simultaneously in Germany, the USA and the UK during the period 1935-1945? Astonishingly, the technologies, ideas, calculating means and calculating techniques existed and were available long before the development of the automatic digital program-controlled calculating device. However, only during the period 1935-1945 did they materialize. Ideas that may be viewed as attempts to develop this type of device began early in the modern era. Babbage (1834) and Ludgate (1909) took the first steps and constructed devices that may be viewed as something like computers. Nevertheless, the concrete fulfillment and practical use of these ideas was accomplished only in the period of 1935-1945, by a group of developers who acted in ignorance of what was done before. This book opens with a detailed discussion of these processes.

    • Educational: English literature
      February 2018

      The Body in Autobiography and Autobiographical Novels

      The Importance of Being Normal

      by Author(s): Menotti Lerro

      This volume explores a web of complex relationships between body and mind, discussing the efforts of individuals from a wide variety of backgrounds to define, to achieve, or to reject the “normal”; and, in some cases, to put something else in its place. After considering the problems arising from other people’s perceptions of non-standard bodies, the book turns to gender: is it written “upon the body”, established at birth, determined only by physical traits and distinguished by material things such as clothes; or is it written “within the body”, defined through the subject’s own feelings? It considers what happens when “males” consider themselves “female”, and “females” consider themselves “male”.It concludes with the analysis of four books, by different authors with different sexual orientations. Two of these volumes might be considered “genuine autobiographies”, while the other two are novels which include numerous autobiographical features that reflect the authors’ own thoughts.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering
      August 2014

      Shining Humanity

      Life Stories of Women in Bosnia and Herzegovina

      by Author(s): Zilka Spahić Šiljak

      Shining Humanity: Life Stories of Women Peace Builders in Bosnia and Herzegovina is a collection of biographies of eleven local peace leaders from varying ethnic, religious, and non-religious backgrounds. As these stories begin to illuminate the women’s deep faith in humanity, they can help to teach us how to become fully human beings in difficult wartime and post-war situations. The women selected for inclusion in this book showed genuine humanity (ljudskost) in the darkness of war and suffering, but dared to imagine a life beyond the imposed boundaries of violence and fear.This book sheds light on the women’s side of peace work and on women’s efforts to (re)build, to heal, to reconcile, to empower, and to embrace all the challenges and complexities of the post-war Bosnian realm. These women hope to teach the next generation that each and every person has the capacity to do something good, and, for this to happen, young people need only have faith that it is indeed possible to change things for the better.The author examines how moral imagination functioned in the lives of women peace builders as they proceeded to make progress in their efforts to bring peace to their communities, and discusses the social history of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), its special dynamics, values, and norms; the role of religion in peace-building in an overwhelmingly de-secularized society; and, finally, the achievements of ordinary women who made extraordinary journeys.This analytical account of the life stories of Bosnian women peace builders provides valuable anthropological material from the local Bosnian context that can offer guidance for other regional, and even global, peace builders. Readers will learn that peace-building in BiH was motivated by the concepts of both care ethics and feminist ethics of justice and compassion, as well as the surviving socialist ethics of unity and equality, and by the universal human rights norms codified in the legal system of BiH. Most of the peace builders in this book are religious, but their religion came into play only later as one of many equally important and relevant rationales for their peace work.These stories do not present an idealized image of women or of perfect peace activists, but rather they tell the tale of ordinary women who bore witness to horror but chose to live in hope.

    • Biography: general

      The American Cockerell

      A Naturalist's Life, 1866-1948

      by William A Weber

      In The American Cockerell: A Naturalist's Life, botanist William A. Weber pulls together pieces of the life of T D A 'Theo' Cockerell, a man who was an internationally known scientist, a prolific writer, and a highly regarded teacher at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The elder brother of the noted scholar Sir Sydney Cockerell, Theo laboured in relative obscurity in America while his brothers and their families were basking in the limelight of smart British society. His contribution to the understanding of wild bees is monumental-he catalogued over 900 species in Colorado alone, and he assiduously collected them wherever he travelled. By 1938 he had published the names and descriptions of 5,480 new species and subspecies. He was also an early supporter of women's rights, a Morrisian socialist, an avid reader, and author of almost 4,000 published scientific papers, book reviews, and discussions of social issues.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering

      Dr. Charles David Spivak

      A Jewish Immigrant and the American Tuberculosis Movement

      by Jeanne Abrams

      Part biography, part medical history, and part study of Jewish life in turn-of-the-century America, Miracle Man tells the story of Dr Charles David Spivak -- the Jewish immigrant from Russia who became one of the leaders of the American tuberculosis movement. Born in Russia in 1861, Spivak immigrated to the United States in 1882 and received his medical degree from Philadelphia's Jefferson Medical College by 1890. In 1896, his wife's poor health brought them to Colorado. Determined to find a cure, Spivak became one of the most charismatic and well-known leaders in the American tuberculosis movement. His role as director of Denver's Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society sanatorium allowed his personal philosophies to strongly influence policies. His unique blend of Yiddiskeit, socialism, and secularism -- along with his belief in treating the "whole" patient -- became a model for integrating medical, social, and rehabilitation services that was copied across the country. Not only a national leader in the crusade against tuberculosis but also a luminary in the American Jewish community, Dr Charles Spivak was a physician, humanitarian, writer, linguist, journalist, administrator, social worker, ethnic broker, and medical, public health, and social crusader. Abrams's biography will be a welcome addition to anyone interested in the history of medicine, Jewish life in America, or Colorado history.

    • Medicine: general issues

      Suburban Shaman

      Tales from Medicine's Frontline

      by Cecil Helman

      'To be a good doctor you have to be a compassionate chameleon, a shape shifter - a shaman. Even if your adaptation to your patients' world happens at an unconscious level you should always work within their system of ideas, never against it...' So writes Cecil Helman after 27 years as a family practitioner in the suburbs of North London interlaced with training and research as a medical anthropologist, comparing a wide variety of health systems. This unique combination of frontline health worker and detached academic informs the many stories that make up this fascinating book. It also informs the author's shared insights into what these stories can teach us about ourselves and our own attitudes to health and illness, whether we are deliverers or recipients of health care. With humour and gentle humaneness, Helman's colourful stories take the reader on a journey from apartheid South Africa, where he did his initial training, to the London of the early 1970s, where for a short time he foreswore medicine to become an anthropologist and poet; from ship's doctor on a Mediterranean cruise to family practitioner in London; from observer of curative trance dances in the favelas of Brazil to consulting with sangomas in South Africa. While trained in the Western tradition and with many years of practice in that system, Helman's anthropological insight leads him to view illness in a wider personal, social and cosmic context, considering elements beyond the purely physical, as do shamans and other traditional doctors. In pleading for this age-old holistic approach, he celebrates family medicine which 'in its quiet and unassuming way, and every day of the week, is still at the very frontline of human suffering'.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering

      Dr William Price

      by Dean Powell

      The amazing story of one of Wales's true pioneers and one of her most colourful characters. He was a surgeon, archdruid, campaigner for human rights and cremation, and was accused sometimes of being a mad, heretic eccentric. The book also looks as his legacy today.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering

      Charles Doolittle Walcott, Paleontologist

      by Ellis Yochelson (author)

      Charles Doolittle Walcott (1850–1927) is one of the most important and highly respected figures in the history of geology. This in-depth biography documents his career and life from birth to retirement from the U.S. Geological Survey in 1907, when he became Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.With very little formal education (he did not complete high school), Walcott became special assistant to James Hall, State Paleontologist of New York, and made a fundamental contribution to the study of trilobites by describing their limbs. He joined the new U.S. Geological Survey in 1879 and rose through the ranks to become its director in 1894, a position he held for 13 years. Walcott is known best for having documented in detail the “Cambrian,” the oldest richly fossiliferous rocks in the world. His primary efforts for the U.S. Geological Survey were in keying fossils to the sequence of rocks, and he brought new precision to the biostratigraphy of the older rocks of North America.A talented and productive scientist, he also applied his talents to administration and made the USGS the most successful scientific organization in the world. At one time he was Director of the USGS, Chief of the Reclamation Service (effectively in charge of national forests), Secretary of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, and chairman of two committees appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt. The publication of his biography will serve to illuminate the life of an important but little-known American scientist.[tab:Author]Ellis Yochelson is past-president of the Paleontological Society and cofounder and past-president of the History of Earth Sciences Society. He is the author of The National Museum of Natural History: Seventy-Five Years in the Natural History Building and editor of the two-volume Proceedings of the North American Paleontological Convention.“Ellis Yochelson leads us to a new, much deeper understanding of Charles D. Walcott and the institutions with which he was associated. He captures an era of geology that is gone, and in so doing may help educate modern readers about the goals and rigors of geoscience in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.”—Kennard Bork, past editor of History of Earth Science

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering

      Charming The Bones

      A Portrait of Margaret Matthew Colbert

      by Anne Brimacombe Elliot (author)

      Born in 1911 to an unconventional, free-spirited artist mother and an eminent paleontologist father, Margaret Matthew chose a career as an artist specializing in restorations of extinct animals. She began her career at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City drawing fossil bones, and there she met her husband, the noted paleontologist Edwin (Ned) Colbert.Charming the Bones portrays Margaret’s life as the wife of a famous man and the mother of five sons and, later in her life, as a respected restoration artist, illustrator, and sculptor.Margaret Matthew Colbert’s paintings, drawings, and sculptures grace museums worldwide and enable the general public, as well as professional paleontologists, to visualize extinct creatures.

    • Biography: science, technology & engineering

      Smithsonian Institution Secretary, Charles Doolittle Walcott

      by Ellis Yochelson (author)

      Charles Doolittle Walcott (1850-1927) is a highly respected figure in the history of geology and paleontology. Perhaps his most notable contribution to his field was his discovery of the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale, one of the most important fossil discoveries ever made. In addition to his distinguished field work, Walcott’s career included years of service as an administrative leader in the scientific community: as director of the U.S. Geological Survey, as secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, as organizer of the National Space and Aeronautics Administration, as a founding member of the National Academy of Sciences.Smithsonian Institution Secretary continues the story Ellis L. Yochelson began in Charles Doolittle Walcott, Paleontologist (1998). Using Walcott’s letters and journals and the recollections of friends and colleagues, Yochelson discusses Walcott’s life and career as secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.Accompanied by illustrations and photographs from private collection

    • Biography: general

      Doctors and Discoveries

      Lives That Created Today's Medicine

      by John Galbraith Simmons

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