• Art & design styles: Surrealism & Dada
      April 2014

      This is Dalí

      by Catherine Ingram, Andew Rae

      Salvador Dalí is one of the most popular artists in the world, known for his lavish lifestyle, gravity-defying moustache and bizarre art. This book tells the story of Dalí's life and explores the meaning of his Surrealist paintings. It goes beyond his fine art practice and discusses his venture into the commercial world from his extravagant jewellery to his cheeky design for the Chupa Chups lollipops. Surrealism is revealed as a way of life; illustrations bring to life the extraordinary Dream Ball at the Coq Rouge, his fabulous home at Port Lligat and his underwater fantasy at the World Fair's Surrealist pavilion. Fun, provoking and endlessly frustrating, Dalí is brought under the spotlight. Catherine Ingram brings her specialized knowledge to the book, while Andrew Rae, an award-winning illustrator, vividly portrays the text.

    • Art & design styles: Surrealism & Dada
      April 2014

      This is Pollock

      by Catherine Ingram, Peter Arkle

      In 1956 Time magazine referred to Pollock as 'Jack the Dripper'. His iconic paintings stretch out with the generosity and scale of the landscape of America's West where the artist grew up. Pollock said that he painted 'out of his consciousness': the cathartic dribbled paint reflected his troubled mind. This book traces Pollock's career and discusses how his loose, individual style was used as a political weapon in the Cold War, representing America as the free, democratic nation. Illustrations simplify the theory and reveal the hidden meaning behind the mesh of painted lines. Series writer Catherine Ingram brings her extensive knowledge to the book, while specially commissioned illustrations by New York-based illustrator Peter Arkle vividly portray the text.

    • Architecture
      March 2008

      Wittgenstein's House

      Language, Space, and Architecture

      by Nana Last

    • Business, Economics & Law
      October 2014

      A Guide to the Modern and Contemporary Art Market

      Including Interviews with the Main International Players

      by Chiara Zampetti Egidi

      The only 'Guide to the Modern and Contemporary art market' of this kind. It is supported by the interviews to over 20 leading art market players (auction house directors, gallerists, art advisors, collectors...). In the appendix there are a lot of useful information, such as a precious dictionary of terms. It is thought for collectors, art investors, artists, journalists, curators, art market players, students and the general public. guidaalmercatodellarte.it

    • The Arts
      August 2010

      Women artists between the Wars

      'A fair field and no favour'

      by Katy Deepwell

      Starting with a critique of existing methodologies and histories of the period, this book examines the production of women artists, looking at different areas and aspects of their activities, and particularly contrasting the lives of different generations of women artists. Many of these women's names or their works are not familiar in art histories of the twentieth century. The book analyses how women artists' presence which was consistently one third of the artists in many major exhibiting groups became less than 10% of the museum purchases and in art historical texts for this period. Comparisons are made between the opportunities presented to women artists and those of their male peers in the light of considerable change and restructuring within the art world in Britain during this period, principally due to the growing influence of modernism in the art market. ;

    • The Arts
      May 2016

      Watching the Red dawn

      The American avant-garde and the Soviet Union

      by Barnaby Haran

      This book offers the first sustained examination of the cultural relations of the American and Soviet avant-gardes in a period of major transformation. From the formation of the USSR in 1922 until its recognition by the American government, American avant-garde artists, writers and designers watched the 'Red Dawn' with fascination, enthusiastically reporting on its post-revolutionary cultural developments in articles and books, and brought these works to an American audience in ground-breaking exhibitions. Americans also emulated and adapted aspects of Soviet culture, as in the case of the New Playwrights Theatre, a group that mixed Russian avant-garde theatrical techniques with jazz, vaudeville and slapstick comedy in plays about strikes and racial injustice. Figures discussed include Louis Lozowick, Jane Heap, Frederick Kiesler, Ralph Steiner, John dos Passos, Margaret Bourke-White and Langston Hughes. Watching the red dawn takes an innovative interdisciplinary approach, considering these developments in architecture, theatre, film, photography and literature, and will be invaluable for students and specialists in these subject areas. It provides a new perspective on American avant-garde culture of the inter-war years. ;

    • The Arts
      September 2016

      Watching the red dawn

      The American avant-garde and the Soviet Union

      by Barnaby Haran

      This book offers the first sustained examination of the cultural relations of the American and Soviet avant-gardes in a period of major transformation. From the formation of the USSR in 1922 until its recognition by the American government, American avant-garde artists, writers and designers watched the 'Red Dawn' with fascination, enthusiastically reporting on its post-revolutionary cultural developments in articles and books, and brought these works to an American audience in ground-breaking exhibitions. Americans also emulated and adapted aspects of Soviet culture, as in the case of the New Playwrights Theatre, a group that mixed Russian avant-garde theatrical techniques with jazz, vaudeville and slapstick comedy in plays about strikes and racial injustice. Figures discussed include Louis Lozowick, Jane Heap, Frederick Kiesler, Ralph Steiner, John dos Passos, Margaret Bourke-White and Langston Hughes. Watching the red dawn takes an innovative interdisciplinary approach, considering these developments in architecture, theatre, film, photography and literature, and will be invaluable for students and specialists in these subject areas. It provides a new perspective on American avant-garde culture of the inter-war years. ;

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Sport and modernism in the visual arts in Europe, c. 1909–39

      by Bernard Vere

      This book highlights sport as one of the key inspirations for an international range of modernist artists. Sport emerged as a corollary of the industrial revolution and developed into a prominent facet of modernity as it spread across Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. It was celebrated by modernists both for its spectacle and for the suggestive ways in which society could be remodelled on dynamic, active and rational lines. Artists included sport themes in a wide variety of media and frequently referenced it in their own writings. Sport was also political, most notably under fascist and Soviet regimes, but also in democratic countries, and the works produced by modernists engage with various ideologies. This book provides new readings of aspects of a number of avant-garde movements, including Italian futurism, cubism, German expressionism, Le Corbusier's architecture, Soviet constructivism, Italian rationalism and the Bauhaus.

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Sport and modernism in the visual arts in Europe, c. 1909–39

      by Bernard Vere

      This book highlights sport as one of the key inspirations for an international range of modernist artists. Sport emerged as a corollary of the industrial revolution and developed into a prominent facet of modernity as it spread across Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. It was celebrated by modernists both for its spectacle and for the suggestive ways in which society could be remodelled on dynamic, active and rational lines. Artists included sport themes in a wide variety of media and frequently referenced it in their own writings. Sport was also political, most notably under fascist and Soviet regimes, but also in democratic countries, and the works produced by modernists engage with various ideologies. This book provides new readings of aspects of a number of avant-garde movements, including Italian futurism, cubism, German expressionism, Le Corbusier's architecture, Soviet constructivism, Italian rationalism and the Bauhaus.

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Sport and modernism in the visual arts in Europe, c. 1909–39

      by Bernard Vere

      This book highlights sport as one of the key inspirations for an international range of modernist artists. Sport emerged as a corollary of the industrial revolution and developed into a prominent facet of modernity as it spread across Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. It was celebrated by modernists both for its spectacle and for the suggestive ways in which society could be remodelled on dynamic, active and rational lines. Artists included sport themes in a wide variety of media and frequently referenced it in their own writings. Sport was also political, most notably under fascist and Soviet regimes, but also in democratic countries, and the works produced by modernists engage with various ideologies. This book provides new readings of aspects of a number of avant-garde movements, including Italian futurism, cubism, German expressionism, Le Corbusier's architecture, Soviet constructivism, Italian rationalism and the Bauhaus.

    • Animals & nature in art (still life, landscapes & seascapes, etc)
      May 2015

      Useless Beauty

      Flowers and Australian Art

      by Author(s): Ann Elias

      The story of Australian art does not begin and end with landscape. This book puts flowers front and centre, because they have often been ignored in preference for more masculine themes.Departing from where studies of single flower artists leave off, Useless Beauty embraces the general topic of flowers in Australian art and shines new light on a slice of Australian art history that extends from 1880 to 1950. It is the first book of broad chronology to discuss Australian art through blossoms, which it does by addressing stories of major figures including Hans Heysen, Margaret Preston and Sidney Nolan, as well as specific objects such as surreal flowers, Aboriginal flowers and war flowers.Whether modern or conservative, the artists in this study shared an intellectual and emotional passion for flora. This was true for men as well as women, despite blossoms being a more traditionally feminine subject.Through spectacular reproductions of historical and contemporary artworks drawn from collections in Australia, the United States, Britain and New Zealand, Useless Beauty explores how flowers influenced the psyche, governed rituals, defined identity and brought a psychological dimension to the everyday. The peak years for flower-centricity in Australian art were between 1920 and 1940 when flowers were known as the apotheosis of useless beauty.

    • Painting & paintings
      December 2009

      Academics, Pompiers, Official Artists and the Arrière-garde

      Defining Modern and Traditional in France, 1900-1960

      by Editor(s): Natalie Adamson and Toby Norris

      Academics, Pompiers, Official Artists and the Arrière-garde: Defining Modern and Traditional in France, 1900-1960 is a collection of eight essays and a scholarly introduction by established and emerging scholars that challenges the continuing modernist slant of twentieth-century art history. The intention is not to perpetuate the vulgar opposition between avant-garde and reactionary art that characterized early-twentieth-century discourse and has marked much subsequent historical writing, but rather to investigate the complex relationship that both innovative and conservative artists had to the concept of tradition. How did artists and art critics conceive of tradition in relation to modernity? What was the role of an artist’s institutional positioning in determining expectations for his or her art? What light is thrown on the structure of the French art world by considering artists from abroad who worked in Paris? How did the war alter modernist and avant-garde paradigms and force crucial changes upon art production in the postwar period to 1960?Particular attention is paid to the terms academic, pompier, official, and arrière-garde, originally used to situate the more conservative artists and works as second-rate or as the negative foil to the assumed radicalism of the avant-garde. By re-evaluating the work of artists pushed to the historical margins by such polemical descriptors, and by proposing alternative understandings of the aesthetic, economic, institutional and political factors that drive our ideas of avant-gardism and the modernist narrative in France, this collection of essays offers new routes to explore the terrain of twentieth-century art in France.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      April 2010

      Grace Crowley’s Contribution to Australian Modernism and Geometric Abstraction

      by Author(s): Dianne Ottley

      Grace Crowley has been recognized as a product of European modernism and was one of the leading innovators of geometric abstraction in Australia. Having studied in Paris in the 1920s with one of the leading art teachers, writers and theorists, André Lhote, she returned to Australia having mastered the complex mathematics and geometry of the golden section and dynamic symmetry, that had become a framework for modernism. Through her teaching of these compositional techniques at the most progressive modern art school in Sydney in the 1930s, she became a crucial influence on the group of artists now recognized as the historical forerunners to American colour-field painting introduced to Australia in the 1960s, and Australian abstraction.Through her close friendship with Anne Dangar, who played a critical role in the success of Albert Gleizes’ utopian art colony in rural France, Crowley maintained contact with mainstream European modernism and links to the Abstraction-Creation Group in Paris. During the 1940s and 1950s, Crowley worked with fellow-artist Ralph Balson, and together they developed their own style of geometric abstract art which reflected the spiritual dimensions of Kandinsky and Mondrian. Although undervalued in her own time, the sincerity and uncompromising quality of her work that transcends national boundaries, makes her one of the most important Australian women artists of her generation.

    • Art & design styles: from c 1960
      December 2014

      Across the Great Divide

      Modernism’s Intermedialities, from Futurism to Fluxus

      by Editor(s): Christopher Townsend, Alex Trott, Rhys Davies

      There’s nothing pure about modernism. For all the later critical emphasis upon “medium specificity”, modernist artists in their own times revel in the exchange of motifs and tropes from one kind of art to another; they revel in staging events where different media play crucial roles alongside each other, where different media interfere with each other, to spark new and surprising experiences for their audiences. This intermediality and multi-media activity is the subject of this important collection of essays. The authoritative contributions cover the full historical span of modernism, from its emergence in the early twentieth century to its after-shocks in the 1960s. Studies include Futurism’s struggle to create an art of noise for the modern age; the radical experiments with poetry; painting and ballet staged in Paris in the early 1920s; the relationship of poetry to painting in the work of a neglected Catalan artist in the 1930s; the importance of architecture to new conceptions of performance in 1960s “Happenings”; and the complex exchange between film, music and sadomasochism that characterises Andy Warhol's “Exploding Plastic Inevitable”.

    • Prints & printmaking
      July 2010

      Creativity and Reproduction

      Nineteenth Century Engraving and the Academy

      by Author(s): Susanne Anderson-Riedel

      The study investigates the engravers’ rise within the French academic system and demonstrates their success in transforming a reproductive medium into a creative and original art genre. In the nineteenth century, graphic artists developed an artistic language that was independent and on par with the original model that they reproduced.The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture welcomed graphic artists into its ranks in 1655. As talented reproductive artists were able to disseminate works of art produced at the Academy, engravers rose to occupy administrative positions at the compagnie in the eighteenth century. Their success notwithstanding, graphic artists remained unable to overcome the perception of being reproductive artisans rather than creative and original fine artists. The proof of their predicament was the continuous refusal of advanced artistic training for graphic artists within the French academic system.The Section de Gravure at the Institut de France, established in 1803, was the first academic institution that distinguished between imitative and creative artistic execution in the reproductive graphic arts. Through patronage, the supervision of competitions, and the administration of the Prix de Rome program for graphic artists, the Engraving Department established specific guidelines for artistic reproduction and encouraged the formulation of an independent, artistic language in the reproductive arts. Finally, it defined the characteristics of fine engraving as a creative art medium.The Prix de Rome for engraving was crucial in consolidating the new understanding of engraving as an original art form. The engravers’ participation in the Grand Prix competition transformed their artisanal training practice in the master’s workshop into an artistic and academic education of graphic artists in the engraving ateliers. Furthermore, their sojourn at the French Academy in Rome encouraged the collegial collaboration between painters, sculptors, and engravers, leading engravers to develop a free and graphic interpretation of their model. The reproductive engraver was now able to rival painters and sculptors and, consequently, he emerged as a creative and original artist.

    • Prints & printmaking
      July 2010

      Creativity and Reproduction

      Nineteenth Century Engraving and the Academy

      by Author(s): Susanne Anderson-Riedel

      The study investigates the engravers’ rise within the French academic system and demonstrates their success in transforming a reproductive medium into a creative and original art genre. In the nineteenth century, graphic artists developed an artistic language that was independent and on par with the original model that they reproduced.The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture welcomed graphic artists into its ranks in 1655. As talented reproductive artists were able to disseminate works of art produced at the Academy, engravers rose to occupy administrative positions at the compagnie in the eighteenth century. Their success notwithstanding, graphic artists remained unable to overcome the perception of being reproductive artisans rather than creative and original fine artists. The proof of their predicament was the continuous refusal of advanced artistic training for graphic artists within the French academic system.The Section de Gravure at the Institut de France, established in 1803, was the first academic institution that distinguished between imitative and creative artistic execution in the reproductive graphic arts. Through patronage, the supervision of competitions, and the administration of the Prix de Rome program for graphic artists, the Engraving Department established specific guidelines for artistic reproduction and encouraged the formulation of an independent, artistic language in the reproductive arts. Finally, it defined the characteristics of fine engraving as a creative art medium.The Prix de Rome for engraving was crucial in consolidating the new understanding of engraving as an original art form. The engravers’ participation in the Grand Prix competition transformed their artisanal training practice in the master’s workshop into an artistic and academic education of graphic artists in the engraving ateliers. Furthermore, their sojourn at the French Academy in Rome encouraged the collegial collaboration between painters, sculptors, and engravers, leading engravers to develop a free and graphic interpretation of their model. The reproductive engraver was now able to rival painters and sculptors and, consequently, he emerged as a creative and original artist.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      April 2010

      Grace Crowley’s Contribution to Australian Modernism and Geometric Abstraction

      by Author(s): Dianne Ottley

      Grace Crowley has been recognized as a product of European modernism and was one of the leading innovators of geometric abstraction in Australia. Having studied in Paris in the 1920s with one of the leading art teachers, writers and theorists, André Lhote, she returned to Australia having mastered the complex mathematics and geometry of the golden section and dynamic symmetry, that had become a framework for modernism. Through her teaching of these compositional techniques at the most progressive modern art school in Sydney in the 1930s, she became a crucial influence on the group of artists now recognized as the historical forerunners to American colour-field painting introduced to Australia in the 1960s, and Australian abstraction.Through her close friendship with Anne Dangar, who played a critical role in the success of Albert Gleizes’ utopian art colony in rural France, Crowley maintained contact with mainstream European modernism and links to the Abstraction-Creation Group in Paris. During the 1940s and 1950s, Crowley worked with fellow-artist Ralph Balson, and together they developed their own style of geometric abstract art which reflected the spiritual dimensions of Kandinsky and Mondrian. Although undervalued in her own time, the sincerity and uncompromising quality of her work that transcends national boundaries, makes her one of the most important Australian women artists of her generation.

    • Art & design styles: from c 1960
      December 2014

      Across the Great Divide

      Modernism’s Intermedialities, from Futurism to Fluxus

      by Editor(s): Christopher Townsend, Alex Trott, Rhys Davies

      There’s nothing pure about modernism. For all the later critical emphasis upon “medium specificity”, modernist artists in their own times revel in the exchange of motifs and tropes from one kind of art to another; they revel in staging events where different media play crucial roles alongside each other, where different media interfere with each other, to spark new and surprising experiences for their audiences. This intermediality and multi-media activity is the subject of this important collection of essays. The authoritative contributions cover the full historical span of modernism, from its emergence in the early twentieth century to its after-shocks in the 1960s. Studies include Futurism’s struggle to create an art of noise for the modern age; the radical experiments with poetry; painting and ballet staged in Paris in the early 1920s; the relationship of poetry to painting in the work of a neglected Catalan artist in the 1930s; the importance of architecture to new conceptions of performance in 1960s “Happenings”; and the complex exchange between film, music and sadomasochism that characterises Andy Warhol's “Exploding Plastic Inevitable”.

    • Animals & nature in art (still life, landscapes & seascapes, etc)
      May 2015

      Useless Beauty

      Flowers and Australian Art

      by Author(s): Ann Elias

      The story of Australian art does not begin and end with landscape. This book puts flowers front and centre, because they have often been ignored in preference for more masculine themes.Departing from where studies of single flower artists leave off, Useless Beauty embraces the general topic of flowers in Australian art and shines new light on a slice of Australian art history that extends from 1880 to 1950. It is the first book of broad chronology to discuss Australian art through blossoms, which it does by addressing stories of major figures including Hans Heysen, Margaret Preston and Sidney Nolan, as well as specific objects such as surreal flowers, Aboriginal flowers and war flowers.Whether modern or conservative, the artists in this study shared an intellectual and emotional passion for flora. This was true for men as well as women, despite blossoms being a more traditionally feminine subject.Through spectacular reproductions of historical and contemporary artworks drawn from collections in Australia, the United States, Britain and New Zealand, Useless Beauty explores how flowers influenced the psyche, governed rituals, defined identity and brought a psychological dimension to the everyday. The peak years for flower-centricity in Australian art were between 1920 and 1940 when flowers were known as the apotheosis of useless beauty.

    • The Arts
      January 2012

      Art, ethnography and the life of objects

      Paris, c.1925–35

      by Julia Kelly, Marsha Meskimmon, Shearer West, Tim Barringer

      In the 1920s and 1930s, anthropology and ethnography provided new and striking ways of rethinking what art could be and the forms which it could take. This book examines the impact of these emergent disciplines on the artistic avant-garde in Paris. The reception by European artists of objects arriving from colonial territories in the first half of the twentieth century is generally understood through the artistic appropriation of the forms of African or Oceanic sculpture. The author reveals how anthropological approaches to this intriguing material began to affect the ways in which artists, theorists, critics and curators thought about three-dimensional objects and their changing status as 'art', 'artefacts' or 'ethnographic evidence'. This book analyses texts, photographs and art works that cross disciplinary boundaries, through case studies including the Dakar to Djibouti expedition of 1931-33, the Trocadéro Ethnographic Museum, and the two art periodicals Documents and Minotaure. Through its interdisciplinary and contextual approach, it provides an important corrective to histories of modern art and the European avant-garde. ;

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